Sukkot – So That Your Children Will Know

By Rabbi Dovid Markel

 

The verse (Vayikra 23:42-43) states: “For a seven day period you shall live in booths. Every resident among the Israelites shall live in booths, in order that your [ensuing] generations should know that I had the children of Israel live in booths when I took them out of the land of Egypt. I am the Lord, your G-d.”

In the statement “in order that your [ensuing] generations should know,” the verse imparts the manner that we are to sit in the sukkah. The experience should be so memorable that it causes future generations to know G-d.

Sukkot is a time to create experiences that leave an indelible mark on ourselves and our children so that we ensure the continuity of the Jewish experience.

When we sit in a sukkah and truly are mindful and are present in the joy of the moment and the awesomeness of being enveloped in the G-dly embrace of the Sukkah, we pass on the excitement of the lively, joyous experience of being together with G-d to future generations.

While the holiday of Pesach imparts the story of the Jewish people to our children, in a sense the experience of sukkot is deeper, as it conveys the joy of Judaism to our children.

While anyone can repeat a story, although they may not be fully in the moment, to communicate the joyousness of Judaism and G-d we ourselves must be fully present within the moment.

The verse (Vayikra 23:42-43) states: “For a seven day period you shall live in booths. Every resident among the Israelites shall live in booths, in order that your [ensuing] generations should know that I had the children of Israel live in booths when I took them out of the land of Egypt. I am the Lord, your G-d.”

In the statement “in order that your [ensuing] generations should know,” the verse imparts the manner that we are to sit in the sukkah. The experience should be so memorable that it causes future generations to know G-d.

Sukkot is a time to create experiences that leave an indelible mark on ourselves and our children so that we ensure the continuity of the Jewish experience.

When we sit in a sukkah and truly are mindful and are present in the joy of the moment and the awesomeness of being enveloped in the G-dly embrace of the Sukkah, we pass on the excitement of the lively, joyous experience of being together with G-d to future generations.

While the holiday of Pesach imparts the story of the Jewish people to our children, in a sense the experience of sukkot is deeper, as it conveys the joy of Judaism to our children.

While anyone can repeat a story, although they may not be fully in the moment, to communicate the joyousness of Judaism and G-d we ourselves must be fully present within the moment.

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